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ARH333 Syllabus

The Great Masters: Leonardo, Michelangelo & Raphael

This unique course will allow you to explore High Renaissance art and architecture in Florence like an insider, exploiting onsite access to High Renaissance artworks in museums, restorations laboratories and many areas normally closed to the general public. You'll learn about the landmark works of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael through onsite discussions in front of their masterpieces, in Florentine galleries like the Uffizi, the Academy (the David), Pitti Palace, Boboli Gardens, and the Medici Chapels. As a follow-up application you'll also get a chance to try fresco painting employing the same materials and techniques of Renaissance artists (like Leonardo). You will also get a rare opportunity to tour historic spaces normally closed to the public including the secret routes, rooms, grottos and gardens of the Medici family's Ducal residences at Palazzo Vecchio and Palazzo Pitti. A benefit of these special activities will be the presence of guest lecturers who will give you practical insights into their work and their careers. Your own critical understanding of the spectacular artistic legacy of the High Renaissance will develop through a sequence of independent looking assignments, group discussions in class, multi-media presentations, and short research reports on various aspects of iconography, style and technique. In the final sessions of the course you will consider the legacy of the High Renaissance and look ahead to the Baroque masterpieces of Bernini, Borromini and Caravaggio.

ARH335FLR Syllabus

Secrets, Signs & Symbols in Italian Art: Exercises in Iconography

It is easy to admire the beauty of great works of art, yet without certain interpretive skills, the modern viewer may not understand their precise meanings as they are often disguised in symbols. Learning the 'secrets, signs, and symbols' of art provides the key to artistic interpretation. The Italian Renaissance is especially rich in meaningful imagery - firmly rooted in both classical and Christian heritage - this symbolic language can sometimes seem a mysterious code to modern eyes. This course provides an examination of the signs and symbols that can help us to decipher artwork produced in Florence during the Renaissance (late-14th century until the mid-16th century). Our review of signs and symbols will be driven by the critical analysis of key art historians such as Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky, and Michael Baxandall. The course will begin with an introduction to iconographic methodology and the meaning of recurrent symbols, including attributes, personifications, and allegories. Our investigation will then turn to specific themes and concepts through an analysis of images, stories, allegories, motifs & context, creation, Mary & Jesus, saints & symbols, and mythology & gods. Lessons and assignments will draw upon a selection of Italian art that best lends itself to specific methodological approaches and key concerns (political, historical/contextual, gendered, etc.). By the end of this course, students will have developed the skills to apply the most significant approaches within art history to critically analyze an Italian Renaissance artwork. Ultimately this will enable students to interpret the symbolic messaging as it was meant to be "read" by the artists' contemporaries.

ARH336FLR Syllabus

Women, Art, and Culture in Italy

This course will explore the role and status of women in connection to Italian Art from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century. After an introduction to key issues and theoretical approaches in the study of women in the arts, the course will proceed thematically and chronologically to explore what it meant to grow up female and what life was like for women from the late fourteenth century through the 1700s. The course will proceed by analyzing depictions of women including saints, personifications and the Virgin Mary as well as female portraits and the nude--both by male and female artists. We will furthermore discuss the role that women played as art commissioners. Famous aristocrats will serve as illustrious examples of female art patronage through three centuries of art history: Isabella d'Este of Mantua (1474-1539), and women closely connected to the Medici court in Florence such as Eleonora da Toledo (1522-1562), Vittoria della Rovere (1622-1694) and Anna Maria Luisa de'Medici (1667-1743). We will finally consider the historical and social prerequisites for the appearance of female artists in history and the socio-cultural conditions these women had to live and work under. Exemplary figures like Sofonisba Anguissola (1532-1625), Lavinia Fontana (1552-1614), Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653), Rosalba Carriera (1673-1757), Giulia Lama (1681-1747) as well as non-Italians Angelika Kauffmann (1741-1807) and Elizabeth Vigée Le Brun (1755-1842) will be discussed in detail. *This course is currently pending approval from the University of New Haven

ARH337FLR Syllabus

Masterpieces in Italian Art from the Middle Ages to the 18th Century

This course will focus on Italian Art from the Middle Ages to the Rococo period and its social, political, and cultural implications. Classes, lectures, and field studies will cover a period of time that lasts from the 14th century to the end of the 18th century. Through the study of defining masterpieces by the most famous Italian artists during those 600 years, this course will consider the historical and cultural context of the main artistic centers in Italy: Florence, Rome, and Venice. Art in various forms - painting, sculpture, and architecture - will be explored, emphasizing the complementary relationships between the artistic disciplines. Students will be introduced to some of the main theories of art in their historical development from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. A brief political history of each period will be presented in order to set the artists and their works in their contexts. Starting with the transition from Medieval to Renaissance art, the course will examine artistic movements, patrons, and individual artists' works and contributions. Artists explored will include Giotto, Masaccio, and Masolino from the beginning of the period, culminating in Michelangelo and Titian. Discussion will then turn to the phenomenon of Mannerism and the development of Baroque art, including an analysis of artworks from Giambologna, Cellini, and Tintoretto to Caravaggio, the Caravaggisti, and Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Finally, the period of Rococo and its particularly ornamental and theatrical artworks will be explored through the works of Giambattista Tiepolo and Rosalba Carriera, the most famous female artist in Europe in the 18th century.

ARH350BCN Syllabus

Public Art in the Global City

This course will examine the social, cultural, economic, and political impact of public art in global cities taking Barcelona as an example and focusing on the study of contemporary artistic practice. Public space has become a place of great complexity in its social and political dimension since the population of global cities has grown in size, plurality, and diversity. Residents, tourists, and real estate developers are some of the actors who negotiate the meanings and values of this space creating an arena of dissension and conflict. Public art, having a great symbolic value, operates within this manifold scenario, not only modifying the architectural and urban morphology of the city, but also infiltrating its social fabric by introducing elements of reflection, debate, and disagreement. The first part of this course will focus on the theoretical framework of public art concentrating on the analysis of some relevant international case studies. The second part will focus on examples of artistic interventions in the public space in Barcelona. The aim of the course is to establish a basis to determine the degree of effectiveness at a social and economic level of this type of artistic practice. Topics include the uses of public art as a visual landmark and tourist attraction; as an urban regeneration tool; as a space of memorial and remembrance; as a generator of civic pride, sense of place and identity; and as a creator of sense of community and collective anchor points. This course will also address issues of spatial inequality taking examples of projects generated both in the city's monumental center and in peripheral neighborhoods. Finally, a comparison will be made between the authorized public art and some illegal artistic practices such as graffiti and street art.

ARH364FLR Syllabus

Bad Blood: Rivalries in the History of Art

Why is there so much bad blood involved in the stories of artists and their artworks? Why did Michelangelo despise Raphael, even for decades after Raphae's death? How did Henry Matisse and Pablo Picasso balance their perpetual competition with a lifelong friendship? What transgression pitted the notorious titans of the London graffiti scene, Bansky and King Robbo, in a rivalry that ended with a tragic and unforeseeable death? Creativity as a result of rivalry has fascinated art historians since the 16th century. In fact, the publication of Giorgio Vasari's biographies in Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects helped establish Florence's place in the art historical world as one in which artists were continuously driven to outdo one another. In Florence and beyond, so many of the "composed" masterpieces from the Renaissance to the contemporary era owe their vitality, innovation, and success to backstage brawling. This course considers commissions, contracts, and artistic creation side-by-side with aspects of the artists' own human experience - envy, jealousy, and the simple need for competition - by analyzing examples of artists' rivalries through the centuries. The drama of these stories is brought to life through contemporary quotes from poems, letters, treatises, contracts, interviews, statements, and more. The recovery and reconstruction of historical and sociological elements through narrative describe how the rivalries that delight today's art fans helped to inform the way cultures approach art and artists. Our investigative journey will transform some of the big names of the art world into real people - grumpy, ornery, antagonistic and flawed - and better reveals how all of us respond to art.

ARH370 Syllabus

Spanish Art

This course will examine the history of Spanish art from prehistoric times to the present day. You will study in detail the artworks of the great Spanish masters with the purpose of achieving an in-depth global understanding of the subject. Instruction will delve into art terminology and how to talk about art for purposes of definitions, characteristics common to a particular movement, individual and general styles, and how the work of art provokes and stimulates the individual. Given the wide range of material, we will focus on artists and artistic movements that have had a significant impact throughout the history of Spanish art. Medieval Romanesque, Gothic and Islamic art, Renaissance and Baroque during the Spanish Golden Age, Modernism, Surrealism, Cubism and the latest tendencies will be studied in depth. Field-studies will be an important part of the course as the city offers important examples of the different movements and styles studied in class. Artistic movements and artists will be placed within their social and historical context, so that you will have a wider understanding of the themes studied, the artistic significance and the social message of the works. A comparison between Spanish and European art will be made in order to give you a more global view and therefore better contextualize works of art. The personalities and opinions of the most representative artists will be studied.

ARH371 Syllabus

Meaning & Mystery in European Painting

Using the great art galleries of Europe as your personal visual library and viewing many masterpieces in the original, you will analyze and learn to appreciate the master works of both Spanish and non-Spanish artists across the canvas of European painting such as El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Sorolla, Picasso, Miró, and Dalí but also Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Botticelli, Rembrandt, Manet, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, Matisse and others. Seeking both meaning and mystery in great works of art, this course deepens your understanding of expression in European painting. Surveying both European and Spanish original masterpieces, this course therefore provides a theoretical and practical foundation for developing the heightened visual literacy required of meaningful appreciation of great painting. It provides a framework for understanding the principles of scholarly analysis and interpretation of painting within their many layers of meaning. The course presents established methodologies and approaches necessary to analyze, interpret and evaluate paintings. You will learn how visual elements of design (color, space, perspective, tone) and principles of composition are articulated, how they relate to each other, and how the artist manipulates them in order to alter the effect on the viewer. The different methodologies of cultural history and art history will be addressed as well, along with the various types of conceptual frameworks for interpretation, including formal-stylistic, aesthetic, technological, historical, ideological, political, sociological and gender-based. Visual lectures use illustrated art works and integrate readings relevant to the various paintings under discussion. In addition, there are visits to the National Museum of Catalan Art which illustrates stylistic developments in painting in Western Europe. The course concludes with student-designed and student-led presentations of selected masterpieces in the art museums and galleries of Barcelona.

ARH374BCN Syllabus

Spanish Art in the Digital Age

The aim of this course is to understand the most recent artistic manifestations and examine the key artists and movements that shaped the contemporary artistic scene in Spain. There was a turning point between the last decades of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century due to the arrival of new technologies that affected all aspects of human life, as well as artistic creation. The course will focus on how these new technologies, media and topics have influenced the most recent artistic creation in Spain. This course will provide a dynamic and multidisciplinary introduction to contemporary art in Spain, including relevant information on the political, historical and cultural context. You will carry out a study of the main topics and materials that contemporary artists use with the purpose of reaching a global understanding of the subject. The course is divided into thematic topics that explore the intersections between art and objects, politics, public space, identity, multiculturalism, gender, nature, memory (personal and collective), and alike. Special emphasis will be made on the media used by contemporary artists, which range from photography, video, digital resources, performance, painting, sculpture to other techniques close to fields like advertisement, marketing or social campaigns for instance. Finally, you will compare Spanish and American artists within each topic in order to gain a global view and the criteria necessary to better contextualize works of art. This course is designed not only for students who are curious about contemporary art but also for those who are skeptical about it. Additionally, this course will give you the tools to look the varied landscape of art today and provide you with a tool kit of questions which are helpful to engage and connect deeply with the work of art. You will be encouraged to have your own personal opinion and feelings about the artworks and share it appropriately. *This course was previous numbered ARH373BCN

ARH460BCN Syllabus

Architecture & Painting in Barcelona

This course provides you with the tools to understand, analyze, appreciate and criticize the works of some of the most relevant artists who have had an outstanding influence in the artistic life of Barcelona over the last 150 years. Throughout this period, Catalonia has played a leading role in the economic development and modernization Spain, while its capital, Barcelona, has assumed an equal endeavor in terms of cultural modernity. Within contemporary Spain the relevance of Barcelona could not be fully comprehended without first understanding the contributions of four main figures of contemporary art and architecture: Antoni Gaudí, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Salvador Dalí. This course is devised as a thorough study of the work, ideas and personality of Gaudí, Picasso, Miró and Dalí and their scope and meaning in the context of contemporary society. Barcelona is the best example of an architectural catalogue of these Artist's movements, therefore it offers the chance to experience and study many of these buildings in situ, analyzing not only their formal, symbolical and historical aspects, but also their integration in the urban framework and their current function as masterworks. The connections between the specific situation of Catalan cultural life and the international context are even more explicit in the case of the three painters that will be dealt with in this course, since each of them has evolved a contemporary conception of art by witnessing or even participating in the introduction and diffusion of that new sensibility, first in Barcelona and later in the rest of the country. You will be able to appraise the significance that Barcelona had in the respective evolution of each artist from an early academic stage to the development of an avant-garde spirit. You will have the opportunity to visit the museums dedicated to all these painters in the city, stressing the importance of the artistic evolution as something beyond pure formalism and always related with a personal, theoretical and historical context. Furthermore, throughout the study of the city and its artists you will be able to formulate a general vision of the beginnings and development of contemporary art and architecture.

BCLA BUSN 3375 Syllabus

Marketing and Distribution Channels

This course will explore the fact that today, most brands make their offerings available through multiple distribution channels and demonstrate how a brands channel strategy may also act as a key differentiator. Students will develop an understanding of how brands can distinguish themselves competitively while taking multichannel marketing, managing of channel conflict, disintermediation, and push vs. pull marketing efforts in the channel into consideration.

BCLA BUSN 3377 Syllabus

Transportation and Logistics Management

This course will provide the knowledge, skills, and tools for understanding core elements of logistics and transportation systems. Students will examine the dynamics of key logistics and transportation decisions, develop an understanding of best practices, and gain an appreciation for the challenges that typical companies face in managing their logistics and transportation network.

BCLA BUSN/COMM 3389 Syllabus

The Business of Social Media

This course will explore the new digital platforms that have profoundly changed how we live, work, and conduct business over the past decade. Students will work to demystify these technologies and develop a deeper understanding of social media as a business tool through a combination of readings, podcasts, class discussion, case analyses, and group projects.

BCLA BUSN/COMM 3389 Syllabus

The Business of Social Media

This course will explore the new digital platforms that have profoundly changed how we live, work, and conduct business over the past decade. Students will work to demystify these technologies and develop a deeper understanding of social media as a business tool through a combination of readings, podcasts, class discussion, case analyses, and group projects.

BCLA COMM 3350 Syllabus

Media and Conflict

This course will provide a structured approach to media systems, and explore the dynamics of news, politics, and freedom of the press. Students will examine how international media report on ongoing, international crises of global importance; investigate the dynamics governing news media; develop an understanding of why audiences from different cultural spheres perceive news in diametrically opposed ways; and gain an awareness of press repression tools used by some regimes and the courageous journalists who try to circumvent these obstacles. Given the rapidly evolving nature of subjects studied, this syllabus is subject to change.

BCLA COMM 3362 Syllabus

Advertising and Society

This course will introduce students to the dynamic relationship between advertising and society. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of how advertising works; discuss the many ways in which our behaviors and attitudes as human beings can be influenced and impacted (both positively and negatively) by advertising; explore various criticisms of advertising; and apply critical thinking skills in the analysis of selected examples of advertising.

BCLA CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the City Barcelona

This course will explore the craft of creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine different aspects of the city in relation to Barcelona narratives including travel, urban spaces, solitude, politics, ethnicity, and particular boroughs and characters (both fictional and real); and participate in both practical exercises and field work.

BCLA FILM 3316 Syllabus

Spain as Seen Through Its Movies: 1980s to Today

This course will investigate the creation of contemporary identities through “Spanish” films and cinematic form. Students will critically examine the notion of a “national cinema”; the role cinema plays in constructing our stories; cinema’s impact on shifting ideas of what constitutes the human condition; and where and how issues of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity surface in cinematic articulations of the relationship between national identity, global trends, and personal history.

BCLA SPAN 1101 Syllabus

Spanish 101

This introductory course is designed for students who have never received formal Spanish instruction or who do not know any Spanish language. Students will develop Spanish communicative proficiency in four key areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing; gain an awareness of Hispanic cultures; and have opportunities to practice Spanish language skills in real-world situations. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 1102 Syllabus

Spanish 102

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 101 or its equivalent. Students will develop Spanish communicative proficiency in four key areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing; gain an awareness of Hispanic cultures; and have opportunities to practice Spanish language skills in real-world situations. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 2201 Syllabus

Spanish 201

This course is designed for students with some prior knowledge of Spanish, who can already use basic words and phrases, and understand simple requests. By the end of this course, Students will have built a solid foundation in five key skill areas: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking, in order to accomplish a variety of everyday needs in the host culture. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 2202 Syllabus

Spanish 202

After completing this course, the student will understand extended speech and readings (TV, movies, newspapers, …). Will be able to communicate with a degree of fluency that will allow them to interact with natives with spontaneity. The information presented will be precise when talking about a field of interest and quite clear when writing or speaking on a range of subjects.

BCLA URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Barcelona

Cities around the world are striving to be ‘global’; Barcelona, the capital of Catalunya, is one of the largest and most cosmopolitan cities in Spain. It is globally-renowned for its art and architecture, possessing no fewer than nine UNESCO-designated ‘world heritage’ sites, and has become a major destination for global tourism. In this interdisciplinary course, students will examine the emergence of this elegant, creative city as Spain’s gateway to the Mediterranean; analyze its history and evolution since its foundation by the Romans; explore the role of population dynamics, industrial change and globalization in shaping the city and the lives of its inhabitants; and investigate the ways in which the interplay of urbanism, politics, and society has addressed challenges of social, political, and technological change in the past and today.

BUS305 Syllabus

Principles of Business Analytics

Businesses are increasingly turning to data analytics to assist in evaluating and improving the decision-making process, so the ability to analyze and use data to inform important decisions is a critical skill for today’s business students. This course explores the fundamental concepts needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in organizations, and it highlights best practices in communicating with analytics professionals to effectively use and interpret analytic models and results for making better business decisions. Emphasis is placed on concepts and the interpretation of results and applications, rather than on theory and calculations. The course will cover the use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive models (including regression, classification, and clustering techniques), and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions.

BUS320 Syllabus

International Business

The increasing globalization of Business makes it imperative to achieve a thorough understanding of the complexities and subtitles of international business activities. Many businesses, that in the past were traditionally considered to be “local” in nature, are now impacted to varying degrees by issues such competition from low cost foreign sources, multi – cultural marketing requirements, and web – based commerce that crosses traditional market boundaries. As a result today’s business leaders must be capable of exploring new opportunity frontiers while dealing with challenges from far away places. This course introduces the student to the field of international management. We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, from the point of view of a medium – large global organization, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select a global company structure, define a global marketing and human resource planning and controlling global business activities. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace. This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals of international business and the key factors that must be considered in the development of a well conceived, global business plan, from the perspective of a medium – large organization that compete in a global market.

BUS329BCN Syllabus

Basic Operations Research Laboratory

This 1-credit course is assignment-based, using Microsoft's Excel software, and is intended to complement the 3-credit Basic Operations Management course (BUS334 / MIS334). More specifically, it consists of weekly, one-hour laboratory sessions in which students develop their skills in the application of Excel in order to resolve Operational Research problems. Emphasis will therefore be placed on the practical implementation of real world models, building on competencies acquired in the 3-credit BOM course. The laboratory sessions are informal and students are expected to contribute in a positive manner. *This course is cross-listed with MIS329BCN

BUS329DUB Syllabus

Basic Operations Research Laboratory (1 credit)

This 1-credit course is assignment-based, using Microsoft's Excel software, and is intended to complement the 3-credit Basic Operations Management course (BUS334 / MIS334). More specifically, it consists of weekly, one-hour laboratory sessions in which students develop their skills in the application of Excel in order to resolve Operational Research problems. Emphasis will therefore be placed on the practical implementation of real world models, building on competencies acquired in the 3-credit BOM course. The laboratory sessions are informal and students are expected to contribute in a positive manner. *This course is cross-listed with MIS329DUB

BUS330BCN Syllabus

Cross-Cultural Management

This course is to show students the critical role culture plays in devising effective international management strategies and techniques. Students will investigate the differences in corporate and social culture to be inclusive leaders. Students will critically analyze the nuances of their own home cultures as well as the host culture in which they are studying. Through case studies, group projects, and meetings with local business leaders, students will gain a new perspective on thoughtful and intentional management. This course will give students a broader cultural lens in the ever-growing global world.

BUS332BCN Syllabus

Entrepreneurship: The Art of Creative Business

More than just small business management, entrepreneurship means identifying market opportunities and capitalizing on those opportunities by marshalling resources and designing a strategy. Students will analyze different mindsets and behaviors of effective entrepreneurs and develop abilities for brainstorming and creating new business ideas. By the conclusion of this course, students will be able to put their entrepreneurial ideas into action by structuring a formal business plan. Through group exercises and team projects, students will apply theoretical models and case studies to create a concrete business plan at the end of the term. Students will complement in-classroom learning with out-of-class site visits and discussions with local entrepreneurs.

BUS334BCN Syllabus

Basic Operations Management

This course introduces the field of operations and supply chain management, a key managerial function that encompasses the design, control, and improvement of processes used to produce goods and/or provide services. The course will explore foundational concepts, including forecasting, production planning, master scheduling, material requirements planning, capacity planning, world-class manufacturing principles, and continuous improvement. Using case studies drawn from global companies, students will apply what they are learning to the study of managerial and mathematical techniques the managerial and mathematical techniques - along with information technology resources - used to make goods and services. *This course is cross-listed as MIS334BCN.

BUS334DUB Syllabus

Basic Operations Management

This course introduces the field of operations and supply chain management, a key managerial function that encompasses the design, control, and improvement of processes used to produce goods and/or provide services. The course will explore foundational concepts, including forecasting, production planning, master scheduling, material requirements planning, capacity planning, world-class manufacturing principles, and continuous improvement. Using case studies drawn from global companies, students will apply what they are learning to the study of managerial and mathematical techniques the managerial and mathematical techniques - along with information technology resources - used to make goods and services. *This course is cross-listed as MIS334DUB.

BUS337 Syllabus

Family Business and Entrepreneurship

The course will begin by defining what is meant by Family Business and its importance to all economies, both developed and developing. Students will firstly become familiar with the entrepreneurship process through which a small business is created. This occurs when individuals identify opportunities, evaluate whether they are viable, and then assemble the resources needed to build a new venture. In the course, some of the unique issues faced by entrepreneurial firms and family businesses will also be presented. Students will be guided through an examination of the challenges of managing small firms and an exploration of the realities of achieving growth. For instance, the following topics will be covered: family ownership (FIAT), family involvement in management (Ferrero) and the influence of a family over a business (including the legacy of a Family Business)(Gucci). Family Businesses have a significant part to play in economies; in Europe 67% of employees are employed in Family Businesses (Pozza, 2009). Performance, Ethics, Innovation and Quality will be proposed and critically evaluated as advantages of family controlled businesses. The course will also address the anatomy of Family Businesses looking at Management Structure, Control Mechanisms, Strategy Formation, Growth Strategy, Supply Chain Relationships, Financial Structure and Culture of Family Business. The course will look at the specific issues surrounding a Family Business from birth and entrepreneurship, through growth stages (including red flags), into continuation to next generation ownership, partial ownership, corporate governance in Family Businesses, into devolvement of control of the business, including the termination strategies for a Family Business. The course will be reinforced with case studies and visits to Family Businesses located in the Florence surroundings. Students will be encouraged to explore and in-bed themselves into the local Family Business tradition by means of site visits and meetings with representatives from such businesses.

BUS351BCN Syllabus

Business Ethics & Management in a Global Context

The course will apply fundamental concepts in ethical theory to business practice, investigate methods of stakeholder analysis, introduce some rudiments of behavioral economics, explore specific ethically and socially sensitive topics in business and management, and lay out the ethically problematic structure of representative real-life cases. To assess such claims, the course selects real-life problematic cases and applies to them moral theories. You will refer to a selected number of texts, research real-world business cases, analyze and give presentations on selected subsidiary readings, and engage in class discussions over specific topics.

BUS353 Syllabus

The Business of Food

Beginning with a short history of food globalization, a concept born of colonization but which has equally dark political implications today, this interdisciplinary course explores how contemporary production and consumption of world-sourced foods challenges the diet, nutrition, and health of world populations, requiring us to re-evaluate the local food choices we make as well as the ethical basis we use to make them. The notion of cheap food (so sophomorically captured by school cafeteria food fights of the 20th century) is at an end and food scarcity is now a reality, as the 2009 food riots from east to west sadly attest. To appreciate the complex global forces at work leading to today's food wars, you investigate how agro-industrial engineering and lobbying, food marketing and advertising, and governmental regulatory and aid policy all determine who eats what and who goes hungry. You will explore today's food supply chain from farmer to plate, discovering the hard realities of contemporary "nutrition"; how food is produced; the effect agricultural practices have on the environment as well as on human and animal health; how global supermarkets affect food choice and freshness; why cultures react differently to GMO foods; and what consequences result from concentrating food in the hands of a few large industrialists (e.g. Nestle, Kraft, Coca Cola, Unilever, etc.) You will also analyze public reaction to food scares (salmonella, BSE, infected poultry, etc.) and the consequent rise of both organic foods and the movement towards farmer's markets, local produce and seasonal eating. You will identify and evaluate the critical role technology plays in food production. The heated GMO debate in Europe, where consumers are highly sceptical if not downright terrified, contrasts sharply with US shoppers who either take them for granted or who remain oblivious to their presence. What cultural reasons account for this? Are nutraceutical and functional foods a fad or a biological necessity? Through cross-cultural comparisons and country reports, you will analyze impassioned debates about how much technology should be allowed onto our plates. The social ills of global food chains will be an important issue for you to diagnose as well. On one hand, starvation, malnutrition, food subsidies and their attendant deleterious effects on developing countries is a common reality. On the other, anorexia amidst plenty and bulimia and obesity in global epidemic proportions characterize entire national populations. You will consider the extent to which these pathologies reflect our troubled relationship with food and the nutritional conflicts it provokes. Through focused research and personal exploration--each supported by onsite investigation of local food market cultures, agro-industry practices, and consumer nutritional behaviour--you will learn that the business, politics & ethics of eating are more complex, more culturally contingent, and more deadly than we once thought. Previously titled as Food Fight! The Business, Politics & Ethics of Eating Course cross-listed as SOC313

BUS355BCN Syllabus

Negotiations

In this course, you will learn how to attain your goals by trying out a variety of verbal and nonverbal persuasion techniques for negotiations. First, you will discover your personal bargaining style. Subsequently, you will learn a variety of negotiation tactics, including “dirty tricks” of psychological manipulation, you will learn how to read people, how to detect lying, and how to influence others and gain power. We will then shift our focus to difficult negotiation situations, such as crisis, high-stake conflict, cross-cultural clash, and eventually “bargaining with the devil.” Throughout the course, you will be role playing with your classmates in a variety of negotiation scenarios: with different stakes, different pace, and with different parties (your boss, co-workers, customers, competitors, investors, friends, and spouses). You will not only experience diverse negotiation situations firsthand in the classroom, but you will also learn how to analyze your performance and you will receive constructive feedback. In-class creative tasks will help you learn how to read people, develop effective communication skills and design a negotiation strategy to reach a successful outcome. At the end of the course, you will have an opportunity to test your newly acquired skills with a guest master negotiator. Upon completion of the course, you should be able to orchestrate successful social interactions in any communication context, not only in negotiations.

BUS356 Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession.

BUS356 Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession. Course Fee: Additional $200 fee associated with this course if taken outside of the Global Business Consulting program.

BUS356 Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession. Course Fee: Additional $200 fee associated with this course if taken outside of the Global Business Consulting program.

BUS356 Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession.

BUS356DUB Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession.

BUS356DUB Syllabus

Business Consulting

Management consulting will continue to be a significant and popular career option, as it provides an opportunity for challenging work, continued self-development, access to important social and professional networks, traveling, and financial rewards. In this course, you will explore the art of using expertise in a field to advise client organizations on high-level strategic issues and provide them with management counsel. Throughout the course, you will experience the opportunity to work on solving executive-level problems and simulate consulting project activities and situations by working on business cases, exercises, and a team assignment based on real-life consulting challenges. The class will be taught using a combination of discussion, cases, and guest lectures. The class environment will be highly interactive and participative. The course with culminate with a Team Project Competition, in which students will be organized into 6 consulting teams: Strategy Consulting, IT Consulting, Marketing Consulting, Human Capital Consulting, Operational/Process Consulting, and Organizational Consulting. While elaborating the course project, you will receive coaching and guidance from the professor in two Consulting Labs to provide you with an intensive on-the-job training experience. The consulting proposals will be presented in the last class and will be judged by a guest consultant. The goal of the course is to provide you with a hands-on experience of management consulting. Therefore, you will be taken on a journey departing from experiencing what business consultants do, who they work for, how they spot consulting opportunities, how they develop proposals, perform business diagnostics, develop solutions, create an effective implementation plan, and skillfully present it to the client. In the process, you will have the opportunity to meet and learn from practicing experts: a management consultant from a large consulting group and an independent consultant, who will be invited to provide information relevant to their firms, their professional experience, and their particular expertise in the profession. Course Fee: Additional $200 fee associated with this course if taken outside of the Global Business Consulting program.

BUS382FLR Syllabus

The Value of Art: Art Management and Marketing

This course investigates the value of art and the ways it has created profit from the past up to the present. Additionally it explores how art is marketed, sold, used, consumed, showcased and managed and how contemporary societies and nations (as the United Arab Emirates) see it as a new profitable sector for the economy of the state. It departs from the logical question: what is art in the first place and how is it turned into money? Furthermore, in today's society, how does art define the lifestyle and identity of individuals? How does it add to social visibility or economic well-being? What is the business that artists make? Who are their agents? What happens to an art-work today? As a powerful form of human expression, art has always been produced for multiple reasons and to various ends. However, beyond its significance as a visual record of our cultural history and the aesthetic appreciation it elicits, art has always been an investment. In the contemporary world, with an established collectors' market, the greater availability of visual culture and mass tourism on the increase, art has become a major business and a financial resource. Taken out of their context and moved into museums, old-masters are divested of their original meaning and have acquired a different purpose and a greater availability. Yet artworks are also privately collected, newly produced or re-produced, thus creating new profits, businesses and agendas, as well as new settings in which contemporary society moves. Issues of art management, art business, marketing and financial value as well as creativity, taste and patronage will be addressed in the very contexts where art is produced and consumed. Specific case studies and on-site lectures will further add to an understanding of business practices related to the art world. What, then, is the value of art? What leads individuals to spend astronomical sums to possess a particular piece? What attracts hordes of visitors to the Uffizi Gallery in Florence or the Sistine Chapel in Rome? Is art a commodity? If so what kind of art is produced today? These and other questions will be raised. Artists and art-professionals, art-historians, curators, gallerists, auctioneers, collectors, art-critics and the students themselves will provide the answers.

COM321 Syllabus

Mass Media & the Fashion Industry

This course will explore the relationship between mass media and the fashion industry from historical Spain to today's new media platforms and globalized communication networks. The first half of the course addresses the primary forms of conventional fashion media (journalism, photography, film, new media) while the second half of the course emphasizes the media dialogue and diplomacy a well as its value arbitration (representation, taste, status, trend, globalization). As an integral part of this course, students will consider the various interactions between fashion and media by personally conducting interviews or fashion show reports. The course includes a shared blog component for posting assignments and critiques of your visits to fashion industry headquarters or exhibitions.

COM340BCN Syllabus

Communication & Global Competence

With the rise of global mobility and communication, encounters between people of diverse and multiple cultural identities are increasingly common. Less obvious are the reasons why these encounters can be challenging and, more importantly, the knowledge and skills necessary for overcoming communication barriers that arise from differences in communication styles and patterns. This course is designed to give students the tools needed to be competent global citizen in the interconnected world. The study of intercultural communication requires not only grappling with broad concepts such as "culture", "communication", and "identity", but also learning how communication styles are patterned within cultural groups. This course thus explores the interaction between culture and communication and introduces students to the knowledge and skills requisite to building intercultural competence. More specifically, this course invites students to analyze and evaluate how their own cultural identity influences communication with others; encourages interaction with the host culture; and prepares students with knowledge and skills to be effective and ethical intercultural communicators.

COM340DUB Syllabus

Communication & Global Competence

With the rise of global mobility and communication, encounters between people of diverse and multiple cultural identities are increasingly common. Less obvious are the reasons why these encounters can be challenging and, more importantly, the knowledge and skills necessary for overcoming communication barriers that arise from differences in communication styles and patterns. This course is designed to give students the tools needed to be competent global citizen in the interconnected world. The study of intercultural communication requires not only grappling with broad concepts such as "culture", "communication", and "identity", but also learning how communication styles are patterned within cultural groups. This course thus explores the interaction between culture and communication and introduces students to the knowledge and skills requisite to building intercultural competence. More specifically, this course invites students to analyze and evaluate how their own cultural identity influences communication with others; encourages interaction with the host culture; and prepares students with knowledge and skills to be effective and ethical intercultural communicators.

COM340FLR Syllabus

Communication & Global Competence

With the rise of global mobility and communication, encounters between people of diverse and multiple cultural identities are increasingly common. Less obvious are the reasons why these encounters can be challenging and, more importantly, the knowledge and skills necessary for overcoming communication barriers that arise from differences in communication styles and patterns. This course is designed to give students the tools needed to be competent global citizen in the interconnected world. The study of intercultural communication requires not only grappling with broad concepts such as "culture", "communication", and "identity", but also learning how communication styles are patterned within cultural groups. This course thus explores the interaction between culture and communication and introduces students to the knowledge and skills requisite to building intercultural competence. More specifically, this course invites students to analyze and evaluate how their own cultural identity influences communication with others; encourages interaction with the host culture; and prepares students with knowledge and skills to be effective and ethical intercultural communicators.

COM351 Syllabus

Social Media: Digital Identity & the Virtual Community

Today's personal, social, political, economic worlds are all affected by digital media and networked publics. With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks (such as Facebook, Friendfeed, Twitter, Linkedin, Digg and Delicious) old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. What do we mean by "community"? How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? How does meaning-making happen in and around the contexts of contemporary social media? In what ways are affinities for these media enabling us to think differently about what it means to read, write, and participate? While much has been made about both media consumption and production, we have yet to understand what it means to truly participate in their situated contexts. This course addresses these questions. Although the course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion and activity takes place in social cyberspaces. Consequently this course requires active participation of students and a willingness to immerse in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. As a practicum, those who complete this course will know how to chat, blog, tag, wiki, avatar, comment, twitter and flicker productively - and have some notion of how these practices affect self and community. This course will also explore the new media landscape in terms of online expression, social networking, identity management, community building, and citizen journalism. How is social media changing the way you work and live? What are the implications for you and for the organizations you will work with? What opportunities and challenges do individuals, news organizations, and businesses face regarding communication, identity/brand management, and community building? How do we understand, participate in, and leverage communities in our current age of many-to-many media? This course is cross-listed as SOC321.

CUL336BCN Syllabus

Cultural History of Spain: From Dictatorship to the Digital Era

This course will examine the impact that various issues such as gender, identity, body, tradition, tourism, violence, media, and new technologies have on Spanish society and democracy. The interdisciplinary focus of this course will examine the intersection of historic and cultural materials (films, music, paintings, art exhibits, and TV) to understand the latest digital shifts in Spanish culture. Students will use an intercultural lens to compare Spanish culture and the culture of the United States. A combination of in-class lectures and discussions are complemented by out-of-classroom learning as students explore the historical and contemporary aspects of Spanish culture. The course is cross-listed with HIS336BCN.

CUL340BCN Syllabus

Food & Culture in Spain

This course introduces Spanish gastronomy while focusing on the complex value codes and beliefs related to Spanish local products and their consumption. The course is divided into four parts. In the first part, students will be encouraged to define the concepts of food and culture, explore the role of cuisine in collective and individual identities, and examine how cultural food habits are created and change. This part covers the broader context that includes and sustains the way food is produced, prepared and consumed in Spain: the Mediterranean diet. The second part of the course explains the theoretical and ideological aspects of cuisine in Spain and identifies the particular characteristics of traditional Spanish cuisine. The third part of the course presents historical events that have shaped the cultural food model in Spain by exploring the influences of the Romans and the Arabs and the Columbian Exchange as the initial basis of the modern Spanish diet. The final part focuses on some of the foods that comprise the core of the Spanish diet. The course includes a number of experiential learning activities that may vary from term to term. These range from visits to local markets and wineries to a variety of workshops, including olive oil tasting, a bread workshop, and a tapas cooking workshop. There is a $25 course fee to cover the cost of these activities.

CUL340FLR Syllabus

Food & Culture in Italy

This course introduces Italian gastronomy while focusing on the complex value codes and beliefs related to Italian local products and their consumption. The course is divided into four parts. In the first part, students will be encouraged to define the concepts of food and culture, explore the role of cuisine in collective and individual identities, and examine how cultural food habits are created and change. This part covers the broader context that includes and sustains the way food is produced, prepared and consumed in Italy: The Mediterranean diet. The second part of the course explains the theoretical and ideological aspects of cuisine in Italy and identifies the particular characteristics of traditional Italian cuisine. The third part of the course presents historical events that have shaped the cultural food model in Italy by exploring the many influences of the modern Italian diet. The final part focuses on some of the foods that comprise the core of the Italian diet. The course includes a number of experiential learning activities that may vary from term to term. These range from visits to local markets and wineries to a variety of workshops, including olive oil tasting, a bread workshop, and a cooking workshop.

CUL350BCN Syllabus

Spanish Civilization & Culture

The aim of this course is to analyze Spanish culture following a historical and sociological perspective. Similarly, the course has an intercultural component comparing home and host customs, traditions and values. You will study the history of Spanish civilization from pre-history to modern times while interacting with Madrid?s reality in order to interpret and understand Spanish culture. Therefore, students will acquire general knowledge of the main events of the history of Spain and their influence upon current Spanish life. Main topics of Spanish life and how they have changed in the last century will be discussed in class to better understand principal current ideological, political, and cultural tendencies in modern Spain. Students will be able to trace the importance of history in the culture in which they are immersed.

CUL351 Syllabus

Sport & Culture in Contemporary Spain

The aim of this course is to analyze the important role that sport plays within European culture in general and particularly in modern Spain. A multidisciplinary study from both a historical and sociological standpoint of the relations between politics, media and sport will serve as a useful route to understanding wider issues in contemporary Spanish society. The historical framework to this module will be provided by an analysis of the socio-political use of sport by the Francoist dictatorship and the repercussions of this heritage on 21st century Spain. The sociology of sport involves in-class analysis of related phenomena such as the role of the media, the business of sport, violence, gender issues regarding sport and cross cultural comparisons with the sports-culture matrix in the USA. The course will adopt a hands-on approach to the subject matter including case studies, field studies to sporting events and organizations, guest lecturers (journalists, sports administrators, professional athletes) and will require a significant level of participation on your behalf.

CUL358 Syllabus

Brand Barcelona: Marketing the Global City

Just as industrialization in the 19th century determined the development and role of the city during the modern period, so the advent of the post-industrial economy and globalization is transforming the city of the post-modern period. As economic control slips from the grasp of nation states, it is left to cities to compete amongst themselves for the investments and incomes so critical to the replacement of vanishing industrial bases. In the process, cities are forced to transform and re-brand themselves as they struggle to adapt to the new geographical, economic and symbolic environment in which they find themselves. Brand Barcelona: Marketing the Global City will critically examine the success of the Barcelona Model of urban redevelopment and self-reinvention, paying particular attention to the way in which marketing has extended its sphere of influence from the selling of commodities to the selling of places. Given the consequent commodification of the city, the question will be raised as to who has benefited and who has lost out in this transformation. As well as providing a solid foundation in theory, the course will also consider contemporary debates over the regeneration of Barcelona and will involve you in an exploration of the invisible city that is concealed by Barcelonas business/tourist friendly facade, through field studies and films. An important part of the assessment will involve project work, through which you will be encouraged to uncover aspects of the city that reveal something significant about how it is being transformed and reinvented through its global promotion. Cross-listed as MKT338

CUL359FLR Syllabus

Black American Grand Tour: Black Women in Italy

This interdisciplinary course will explore the experiences of nineteenth-century Black American women in Italy. During the course students will examine the ways in which race, gender, class, age, nationality, and other social categorizations may intersect in Black women?s experiences. Students will come to understand how for Black women, travel equaled freedom and crossing the ocean meant leaving restraining norms of the home society behind. Through in-class discussions, lectures, cultural experiences and field studies, students will learn and reflect on the experience of nineteenth-century Florence and its foreign visitors.

CUL360BCN Syllabus

Immigration, Race & Identity in Contemporary Spain

"If the name and the identity of something like the city still has a meaning, could it, when dealing with the related questions of hospitality and refuge, elevate itself above nation-states or at least free itself from them in order to become, to coin a phrase in a new and novel way, a free city?...[A] certain place (diplomatic or religious) to which one could retreat in order to escape from the threat of injustice." (J. Derrida, 2001) In recent years, immigrant and refugee movements have increasingly come to the fore in Spain and Europe. Immigration is a relatively recent phenomenon in Spain which has traditionally been a country from which people emigrated. Indeed, the word inmigrante was generally used not to refer to people from other countries but rather to people from other parts of Spain. The rising prosperity of Spain that followed its membership to the European Union reversed this trend, and from the 1990?s onwards, Spain played host to increasing numbers of foreign immigrants. Since the early 1990s the foreign born population of Spain has risen from about 1% to around 10%. The 2004 terrorist attacks in Madrid and the steady stream of Africans risking the treacherous crossing from the North African coast sharpened public awareness about this issue. This upsurge in immigration has bought about a transformation of Spanish cities as the recently arrived residents carve out a niche for themselves within the existing socio-economic order, while resident population adapts and responds to their presence. As immigrants, asylum seekers, and refugees move 'within' and across Spanish urban borders, they impact the familiar and the 'rigid orders of the self'- to borrow the words of the German novelist Günter Grass. They thus incite an array of responses in different contexts and forms. Therefore, just as is happening in the U.S., discussions on migration to and from the country meet in that discursive space where critical concepts like 'home,' 'identity,' 'subjectivity,' and 'otherness' eschew stereotyping. Employing cross-cultural and multi-disciplinarian approaches to the subject of how identity is formed, challenged and defended in an ever more globalized world, you investigate in this course the pressing issues of immigration, race and ethnicity that have sparked such controversy and passion both in contemporary Spain, Europe and the U.S. To this end, your analytical focal point is placed upon the city and suburbs of Barcelona, where the presence of diverse immigrant communities offers opportunity for direct exploration of how effectively they and their second generation descendants have been incorporated and integrated into the Spanish political, economic, societal and cultural mainstream. You will therefore experience at firsthand how the city has changed in the past thirty years and how it is still changing beyond tourist stereotypes through a strong process of cultural hybridization.

CUL363BCN Syllabus

Heroes in the 21st Century: Understanding the World through TV Shows

Television shows are the main storytellers of the 21st century, serving as visual vehicles to communicate cultural, social, political, philosophical, and economic ideas that are currently at issue in public debates. Since television shows' heroes and protagonists represent abstract and complex philosophical concepts in the real world, an analysis of these concepts and their role in the shows can help us understand and question our reality, our culture, and the reasons behind our own actions and opinions. This course will provide you with analytical tools to examine popular contemporary and classic television shows from the US and Spain. As a result, you will be exposed to a number of topical issues including environmental ethics, animal welfare, abortion, attitudes towards same-sex marriage, capital punishment, privacy and public domain in the digital age, and the role of technology. You will revisit your own ideas on these topics in order to understand the extent to which your personal beliefs and actions in your daily life align with cultural and political institutions. Moreover, you will reflect on how culture may shape different worldviews by analyzing US vs. Spanish TV shows and comparing your own perspectives with those of local people in your study abroad location. Throughout the course you will be required to watch selected TV show episodes and complete readings that will guide you in the cross-cultural analysis of different concepts. Prior knowledge of specific TV shows is not required.

DBLN BUSN 3371 Syllabus

International Business

This course will examine business environments in an international context, focusing specifically on Ireland and the European Union. Students will explore political, economic, and ethical contexts for policy and business operations and the cultural intricacies of international and global business; compare and contrast new knowledge with that of their existing understanding of business policy and practice in the United States; and develop broad perspectives required of successful managers working in an increasingly globalized world and workforce.

DBLN BUSN 3374/ECON 3360 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will examine key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment (both goods and services and capital and labor), the global finance architecture, and competing in a global marketplace, as well as two underlying themes evident throughout the module: contemporary context and localized content of the material.

DBLN BUSN 3374/ECON 3360 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will examine key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment (both goods and services and capital and labor), the global finance architecture, and competing in a global marketplace, as well as two underlying themes evident throughout the module: contemporary context and localized content of the material.

DBLN COMM 3321 Syllabus

Ethics and the Media

This course will address principle ethical issues facing journalism, advertising, entertainment media, and online content. Students will examine the moral obligations of the producers as well as the responsibilities borne by consumers; develop an understanding of applicable ethical principles and philosophies; apply these to present day cases in the media through case studies; and critically engage with content in order to analyze ethical issues present in the production and consumption of media on an individual and societal level.

DBLN FILM/LITR 3314 Syllabus

Irish Literature and Film

This course will examine dominant images of Ireland in film and literature from Romantic Ireland and the images of the Celtic Revival, to the harsher realities of Irish life and the transformations of Irish society under modernity and globalization. Issues discussed will include emigration and immigration; nostalgia and loss; gender, family and community; Church and State; politics and violence; language and communication, and the country and city. Students will examine the pressures placed on literary/visual styles associated with Romanticism, Realism, and Modernism by the anomalies of Irish experience. Authors and filmmakers discussed will include a broad range from W.B. Yeats and James Joyce, to Alice MacDermott, Tana French, Neil Jordan, and Ken Loach.

DBLN FILM/LITR 3314 Syllabus

Irish Literature and Film

This course will examine dominant images of Ireland in film and literature from Romantic Ireland and the images of the Celtic Revival, to the harsher realities of Irish life and the transformations of Irish society under modernity and globalization. Issues discussed will include emigration and immigration; nostalgia and loss; gender, family and community; Church and State; politics and violence; language and communication, and the country and city. Students will examine the pressures placed on literary/visual styles associated with Romanticism, Realism, and Modernism by the anomalies of Irish experience. Authors and filmmakers discussed will include a broad range from W.B. Yeats and James Joyce, to Alice MacDermott, Tana French, Neil Jordan, and Ken Loach.

DBLN INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course (GIC) provides a unique and innovative opportunity for students to engage in an internship abroad for academic credit. Through its academic content, the course frames and supports learning that occurs at the internship placement and students’ personal and professional development.    The GIC supports CEA CAPA's philosophy and practice of enabling students to learn about the social and cultural context of their internship through comparative global analysis on both micro- and macro- levels. In-class active learning gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, organizational behavior, and management in a cross-cultural context. Out-of-class field studies engage experiential and place-based pedagogies that enhance in-class discussions. Students also analyze the importance of, and approaches to, justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) from national and international perspectives. 

DBLN INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (6 credits)

The Global Internship Course (GIC) provides a unique and innovative opportunity for students to engage in an internship abroad for academic credit. Through its academic content, the course frames and supports learning that occurs at the internship placement and students’ personal and professional development. The GIC supports CEA CAPA's philosophy and practice of enabling students to learn about the social and cultural context of their internship through comparative global analysis on both micro- and macro- levels. In-class active learning gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, organizational behavior, and management in a cross-cultural context. Out-of-class field studies engage experiential and place-based pedagogies that enhance in-class discussions. Students also analyze the importance of, and approaches to, justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) from national and international perspectives.

DBLN LITR/THTR 3320 Syllabus

Storytelling: Writing Irish Cultural Narratives

This course will examine the role of storytelling in Irish culture and the way in which ‘story’ is used to create a narrative of Irish culture. It will provide an introduction to traditional oral folk traditions, modernist documentations in the Irish short story, theatrical performance, filmic narratives, and the contemporary iteration of cultural change on the streets of its capital city. Through exploring the tradition of storytelling in Ireland, from conservation to subversion and from folk tale to street art, students will discover in and out of the classroom how this embedded feature of Irish culture allows and obstructs how to present and represent a nation to itself and others and how the students too can create a story. Students will have an opportunity to practice immersive research and to engage in a variety of different modes of storytelling. Note: This course has supplemental fees for theatrical entrances and other field activities.

DBLN LITR/THTR 3320 Syllabus

Storytelling: Writing Irish Cultural Narratives

This course will examine the role of storytelling in Irish culture and the way in which ‘story’ is used to create a narrative of Irish culture. It will provide an introduction to traditional oral folk traditions, modernist documentations in the Irish short story, theatrical performance, filmic narratives, and the contemporary iteration of cultural change on the streets of its capital city. Through exploring the tradition of storytelling in Ireland, from conservation to subversion and from folk tale to street art, students will discover in and out of the classroom how this embedded feature of Irish culture allows and obstructs how to present and represent a nation to itself and others and how the students too can create a story. Students will have an opportunity to practice immersive research and to engage in a variety of different modes of storytelling. Note: This course has supplemental fees for theatrical entrances and other field activities.

DBLN LITR/THTR 3321 Syllabus

The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland

This course explores how Irish playwrights have contributed disproportionately to the output of English-language drama over the course of the 20th century. This practical playwriting course will interrogate the tradition of theatrical writing in the Irish capital of Dublin at a time when that tradition is undergoing radical changes in terms of form, experimentation, and the shifting role of the playwright in the process of theater-making. Challenged by a wide range of individual and group exercises, students will be exposed to a host of methodologies for writing and creating work for the stage specific to this unique moment in Irish theatrical history, and in the process gain an appreciation for the important role writers still play in making theatrical performance. Students will examine the range of skills required to write and present successful drama; and will explore, discuss, and present new dramatic work in a supportive environment. Note: This course has supplemental fees for theatrical entrances and other field activities.

DBLN LITR/THTR 3321 Syllabus

The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland

This course explores how Irish playwrights have contributed disproportionately to the output of English-language drama over the course of the 20th century. This practical playwriting course will interrogate the tradition of theatrical writing in the Irish capital of Dublin at a time when that tradition is undergoing radical changes in terms of form, experimentation, and the shifting role of the playwright in the process of theater-making. Challenged by a wide range of individual and group exercises, students will be exposed to a host of methodologies for writing and creating work for the stage specific to this unique moment in Irish theatrical history, and in the process gain an appreciation for the important role writers still play in making theatrical performance. Students will examine the range of skills required to write and present successful drama; and will explore, discuss, and present new dramatic work in a supportive environment. Note: This course has supplemental fees for theatrical entrances and other field activities.

DBLN SOCY 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Dublin

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on Dublin. Before exploring the city chronologically, students will examine ancient Ireland’s global influence, then re-trace the Viking City through to its current form, which is characterized by urban sprawl, multiculturalism, and its connection to Europe and the global economy; contextualize and develop informed interpretations of their personal experiences in Dublin; and develop a deeper understanding of Irish history, politics, and society.

DBLN THTR 3319 Syllabus

Performance in an Irish Context: Performance/Manifesto

This course explores the performance tradition of Irish theatre. Students learn to present the text, language and predominantly historical rural landscape of Irish playwrights including Friel, Beckett, and Marina Carr. This experience will then be developed into the creation of personal research narratives for performance, drawing on a contrasting sense of place. This will be complemented by engagement with the political and social realities of the city. Through a carefully structured program, students will learn ways to understand and approach the role of silence in Beckett, voice in Friel, or the shaping by landscape of characters, language, and movement in Carr. Students will respond to the visual and social prompts of the city of Dublin as they are stimulated and nurtured to develop source material for performance and presentation. Prerequisite: One previous college-level fundamentals of acting or performance class / theater performance course. Note: This course has supplemental fees for theatrical entrances and other field activities.

ECN322BCN Syllabus

Comparative Economic Systems

This course describes the pillars and mechanisms upon which market capitalism functions. As the dominant socio-economic system, understanding these aspects is indispensable for comprehending today's world and one's own role in it. Drawing from economics and other social science disciplines, students will trace history, balance theory, and practice to explore market capitalism?s strengths and shortcomings, as well as the role of institutions and economic agents that make it function as it does: international organizations, nation-states, transnational companies and civil society. Using diverse case studies, students will analyze how capitalism can vary in different contexts. Students will employ comparative methods to explore these differences within capitalism, as well as other socio-economic systems, particularly socialist economies. The role of culture and religion in these systems is also considered.

ECN330BCN Syllabus

Money & Banking

The course focuses on the connections between money (the Federal Reserve) and financial markets with financial institutions as their main actors (banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, insurance companies, the shadow banking system) in the modern market economy. Upon completion of this course you will have a thorough understanding of the role of money and banks in the broader economy and of the unique role of banks in the financial system. In this course, you will gain a macroeconomic perspective on capital markets and the banking system by learning how interest rates and exchange rates are determined and manipulated, and how to interpret and predict implications of monetary policy conducted by the Federal Reserve. You will also comprehend financial market inefficiencies (such as asymmetry of information) and notions of behavioral finance. You will analyze the performance of government, markets, and institutions in the context of economic problems. Topics will include unconventional monetary policy tools during financial crises, the future of banking and new developments in the financial system such as cryptocurrencies. Throughout the course you will have the opportunity to widen your horizons on a chosen topic with a project based on real-life context (country, company, market), such as offshore banking regulations in tax heavens countries, or how banking can benefit from blockchain technology.

ECN340BCN Syllabus

Intermediate Macroeconomics

Macroeconomics is the "big picture" of the economy. Macroeconomics studies the economy as a whole whereas microeconomics is about how individuals and firms make decisions. Since the economy affects all of us in different ways, it's important for everyone to know about macroeconomics. In this course we will develop and analyze macroeconomic models to understand how economies grow over the long-run, how the economy operates when resources are fully employed, why economic performance might deviate from its full-employment ideal in the short-run, and what policy-makers can do - if anything - to improve economic performance and human well-being. The level of the course goes beyond macro principles in terms of both breadth and depth. Topics of the course will include (1) the measurement of output and prices, (2) determinants of economic growth, (3) business-cycle fluctuations, (4) fiscal policy, and (5) monetary economics. We will focus on the modern theories of the determination of the level and rate of growth of income, output, employment, and the price level. We will also discuss the implications of each theory on alternate fiscal and monetary policies seeking to facilitate full employment, economic growth and price stability. Since macroeconomics is an empirical discipline, you will become familiarized with the current macroeconomic data and its relevance. By the end of the course, you should have a solid grounding in the basic theoretical approaches used in macroeconomics as well as an understanding of the economic data that is commonly analyzed. Observations from the US economy and from a number of other economies will be used throughout the course.

ENV320BCN Syllabus

Introduction to Global Climate Change

This course provides an overarching introduction to the causes and consequences of Earth?s recent anthropogenic climate change and its intersection with environmental, social, economic, and geopolitical issues. Class sessions will examine foundational physical processes that determine the Earth's climate and demonstrate how former civilizations, flora, and fauna adapted to previous non-anthropogenic changes in climate. Further investigation will examine the connections between the industrial revolution, demographic evolution, and rising living standards, powered by the ever-increasing use of fossil fuels. Further, students will synthesize the link between climate change and other environmental challenges - such as access to water, preservation of biodiversity, plastics, and carbon emissions. Students will also analyze empirical observations on trends in Earth's rising average temperature; debate about climate change-related topics including their social impact and challenges of communication; and investigate current and potential climate policies, initiatives, and international political responses.

ENV332 Syllabus

Natural Resource Management: Conflict & Cooperation

This course analyzes the transformation occurring at the intersection between the theory and practice of international relations on the one hand and issues related to the management and exploitation of environmental and natural resources on the other. The relative abundance or scarcity of natural resources has long been a major factor in accounting for the rise and fall of civilizations. It is also a major cause of regional tension and international warfare. Conflicts over the struggle for scarce natural resources (i.e. the so called 'resource curse') are common today while 'resource nationalism' in resource-rich countries (e.g. Russia, Venezuela, and Brazil), exacerbated by tight supply of conventional energy sources, harbors the potential for global economic disruption. In a similar vein, the global scale of modern economic systems blurs the traditional distinction between rich North and poor South. The rise of high-consumption societies now cuts across international regions and borders while the distance between those who benefit from high consumption and those who suffers from its social and environmental impact grows inexorably. Notwithstanding, we have witnessed over the last four decades the emergence of a deeper understanding of the intrinsic value of environmental natural resources along with a newly-felt sense of urgency for dealing with the collective problems arising from their use and (or) degradation. The concept of natural resources has expanded from a traditional, restrictive view of simple material economic inputs to one that now includes those environmental and ecosystem variables whose role is fundamental in guaranteeing the integrity of life-supporting earth systems. You will address and analyze these realities in three parts. You begin by reviewing the basic concepts and theories of international relations theories as well as the evolution of the analytical paradigms that have been used to frame the relation between human development and the natural environment. You will then focus on the visible output of global environmental politics, i.e. international regimes for environmental, nature and habitat protection and conservation. The course will end by looking in detail at the energy-climate nexus, as the competition for hydrocarbons represents a potential trigger of conflict but which also opens the doors to a serious effort to accelerate the pace of development and deployment of alternative sources of energy that are key to reducing the production of greenhouse gases. This course is cross-listed as IRS332

FLOR ANTH 3341 Syllabus

Food Systems in a Globalized World: Where Does Our Food Come from and How Is It Produced?

This course explores the various and articulated connections between food systems and globalization. It will analyze the global food scene from an historical, political, economic and cultural perspective with a focus on the Mediterranean diet, public health, migration, food production, distribution and sustainability, and Italy’s role in the global food economy. Furthermore, it will explore the global threats of industrial food production from a public health perspective comparing the major health issues in a globalized world, with a special focus on the recent epidemic of Covid-19 and the relationship with industrial food production and its impact on the global food systems. The course provides students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic and environmental implications of food production, distribution and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health.

FLOR ARTH 3311 Syllabus

Renaissance Art History

This course will introduce a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence from the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, with a special focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Students will examine issues of social, political, and economic context, as well their function, which was integral to artistic production of the period; conduct related scholarly research; deepen their appreciation of Renaissance civilization; and analyze the interrelationship between people’s creative achievements and their society.

FLOR ARTH 3313 Syllabus

Museology: The Art of collecting Objects

This course will investigate the birth of art collections and museums from Roman porticos to 19th century European museums. Students will examine the history of collecting objects; develop an understanding of the role museums play in contemporary society by researching, analyzing and interpreting such factors as an artwork’s social significance in the past, its original location, the patron who commissioned it, and the interests of the collector who decided to place the piece in a museum; visit museums; and conduct personal research with other visitors to Florence’s museums.

FLOR ARTS 1103 Syllabus

Beginning Composition Drawing

This course will introduce students to fundamental approaches, techniques, tools, and mediums of drawing. Students will focus on various aspects of Florence as subject matter; enrich studio work with encounters with Florentine artists and through field studies; increase their visual awareness and perception; explore their creative potential and ability to make visual statements, while enjoying the challenge of drawing; and visually interpret examples of the impact of globalization in the urban environment through their artwork.

FLOR ARTS 1104 Syllabus

Beginning Watercolor

This course will introduce students to the materials and techniques of the unpredictable medium of watercolor painting within the framework of Florence. Students will focus on various aspects of Florence as subject matter; enrich studio work with encounters with Florentine artists and through field studies; increase their visual awareness and perception; explore their creative potential and ability to make visual statements, while enjoying the challenge of painting; and visually interpret examples of the impact of globalization in the urban environment through their artwork.

FLOR ARTS 1105 Syllabus

Beginning Figurative Sculpture

This course will introduce basic tools and techniques of figurative sculpture, focusing on skills and techniques necessary for clay modeling. Students will approach full three-dimensionality, starting with the copy of a detail of Michelangelo’s David and ending with the copy of the Bernini’s portrait of Costanza Bonarelli, following the entire process through a step-by-step demonstration. Following this, students will have the opportunity to develop an idea for a personal project, based on a theme, and present it with a proposal. They will also take part in a jewelry-making workshop.

FLOR ARTS 1106 Syllabus

Beginning Oil Painting

This course will introduce students to the materials and techniques of the versatile medium of oil painting within the framework of Florence. Students will focus on various aspects of Florence as subject matter; enrich studio work with encounters with Florentine artists and through field studies; increase their visual awareness and perception; explore their creative potential and ability to make visual statements, while enjoying the challenge of painting; and visually interpret examples of the impact of globalization in the urban environment through their artwork.

FLOR ARTS 1107 Syllabus

Introduction to Photojournalism

This course will introduce technical digital SLR camera skills, focusing on compositional elements and photography’s narrative possibilities. Students will explore the history of photography through analysis of projects and images realized by famous photographers; create personal visual tales of their experience of a new, unknown reality; develop an understanding of the relationship between technical skills and creative purposes; and examine the ways in which photography can be used as a tool of documentary record, cross cultural understanding, artistic expression, and self discovery. Students will be required to have a digital SLR camera for this course.

FLOR BUSN 3372 Syllabus

International Marketing

This course will explore terms, concepts, and theories of marketing in the international context, as well as its scope and challenges. Students will examine how global dimensions technology, research, capital, investment, and production impact marketing, distribution, and communication networks; gain insight into the increasingly interdependent global economic and physical environment and its impact on international marketing; analyze current international marketing issues and their implications; and develop an understanding of how companies create competitive strategic plans that enable them to survive and succeed in global markets.

FLOR BUSN 3373 Syllabus

International Finance

This course will examine the topic of finance in the international context. Students will explore historical perspectives and foundations of international finance, international capital flows, foreign direct investment, the exchange rate determination and exposure management, international capital markets and institutions, and financial management of a multinational firm; examine the current economic landscape through topical discussions of current economic and political developments and their impact on international finance; and develop an understanding of the opportunities and risks associated with international finance.

FLOR BUSN 3374 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will explore key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; critically examine the global economic landscape with an emphasis on the interaction between international economics and business through discussions of current economic and political development; and explore topics such as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment, the global monetary system, and competing in a global marketplace.

FLOR BUSN 3376 Syllabus

International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior

This course will examine how theories, experimental research, and current issues in the field of organizational behavior apply in the context of the international workplace. Students will focus on the application of core management theories and strategies, base their studies on interdisciplinary research from fields including psychology, sociology, economics, political science, and anthropology; develop an understanding of human behavior within a global work environment and across historical and current issues; and reflect critically on how theoretical frameworks can be applied and developed within the organizational setting.

FLOR BUSN 3378 Syllabus

Global Workforce Management

This course will provide students with an integrative framework for understanding the business and legal challenges associated with effective workforce management on a global scale. Students will compare international labor markets in terms of labor costs, labor supply, and workplace culture; and analyze case studies from developed and emerging economies to investigate the complex cultural and regulatory environment that multinational firms face in such areas as talent management, performance management, offshore outsourcing, downsizing, and industrial relations.

FLOR BUSN 3380 Syllabus

Managing Global Supply Chains

This course will focus on issues within operations that are of relevance to a firm’s ability to remain competitive in a global economy. Students will explore legal, ethical, operational, venture risk, and reliability factors in addition to specialized topics in supply chain management within a global environment; analyze how factors of instability such as terrorism, climate change, and political and cultural contrasts can be unsurmountable walls, crises to manage, or occasionally, business opportunities; and develop an understanding of the dynamics and opportunities around the world for global companies.

FLOR CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the City: Florence

This course will introduce creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine how various subjects such as the river, urban spaces, solitude, ethnicity, particular boroughs, and characters (both fictional and real) function in Florence narratives; develop an understanding of the role of memory and experience in literary psycho-geographical accounts of the metropolis; utilize their observations of Florence to practice creative writing, and investigate the potential of place within the narrative of various genres.

FLOR ECON 3370 Syllabus

The Impact of Globalization on European Markets

This course will examine the impact of globalization on the international economy and in particular on European markets. Students will analyze the global economy; familiarize themselves with all of the interconnected topics that characterize the current intriguing political and economic debate; explore the current financial global crisis; and develop an understanding of the views of several distinguished economists, the importance of the Bretton Woods system and international economic institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

FLOR FILM 3316 Syllabus

Contemporary Italian Cinema: Contemporary Italy on the Screen

This course will introduce contemporary Italy’s major issues (immigration, acceptance of diversity, relationships with politics, and racism) through recently released films. Students will analyze 20 films from the late 1990s to the present day; develop an understanding of contemporary Italian society through the image that some of the most valuable Italian filmmakers of the youngest generation have given of the cultural, political, and working environment they live in; and explore the ways in which contemporary Italian cinema has followed, mirrored, and sometimes even anticipated, cultural and social transformations in Italian society.

FLOR HIST 3319 Syllabus

Political & Economic History of Europe in the Twentieth Century

This course will introduce the history of Europe in the 20th century, focusing on major political and economic movements and events. Student will consider relevant national and international environments; investigate ways in which European development influenced national and international contexts and how national and international factors conditioned European events; analyze events of European history from a world-scale perspective; develop a rigorous framework to engage European political doctrines and ideologies, and specific economic systems; and draw parallels between the two major political and economic paradigms: Western and Eastern.

FLOR HIST 3325 Syllabus

A Cultural History of Florence from the Renaissance to Present

This course will introduce the cultural identity of Florentines and the history of Florence, covering four main periods: the Renaissance, foreign rule, 1815 - World War I, and fascism through to the present day. Students will investigate key patterns of the Florentine cultural identity paradigm, including a variety of aspects within topics such as politics, economy, religion, law, arts, and language; and examine lines of continuity and discontinuity between Florentine, Tuscan, Italian, European, and world cultural patterns.

FLOR LING 3356 Syllabus

Language and Identity

This course will reflect on the essentiality of language and its role in forming human identity. Through collaborative and comparative learning processes, students will broaden their understanding of how language and identity intertwine and interconnect across different spaces, times, and environments; and examine how language intervenes in identity building at various levels. This course is a CAPA fully Globally Networked Learning course—the first of its kind and an unprecedented enterprise in study abroad.

FLOR LITR 3315 Syllabus

Florence and The Florentine in the Divine Comedy and Decameron

This course will explore the Florentine literary world, focusing on great masterpieces from the 14th century, such as Dante’s "Vita Nuova" and "The Divine Comedy" and Boccaccio’s "The Decameron". Students will take a multidisciplinary approach to English translations of these texts, examining their social, political, historical, and philosophical implications, while giving special attention to the impact that the Medieval/Renaissance city of Florence had in their writing. Students will develop an understanding of why certain forms of artistic expression are peculiar to certain ages, at times to the exclusion of others.

FLOR PSYC 3320 Syllabus

Cross Cultural Psychology

This course will explore the field of cross-cultural psychology through a focus on Italy and its inhabitants. Students will discuss aspects of cross-cultural analysis from the field of cross-cultural psychology, including cultural influence on human behavior, attitude, values, communication, and societal organization; examine topics of ethnocentrism, individual vs. collective societies, plural societies, cultural views on mental health, and intercultural communication; and investigate methodical issues of cross-cultural research, with the opportunity to be participant-observers of their own experiences in Italy, including through field work.

FLOR PSYC 3361 Syllabus

Abnormal Psychology

This course will introduce the psychological, biological, and experiential factors thought to influence the symptoms, etiology, course/prognosis, and treatment of mental disorders in adults. Students will develop an understanding of the rationale for the diagnostic criteria and other clinical signs accompanying common DSM-5 disorders; causal and maintenance factors of disorders; and examples of empirically supported treatments.

FLOR PSYC 3362 Syllabus

Into the Light: Identity, Globalization, Prejudice, and Moving Forward Together

This course sheds light on the relationships among identity, globalization, the rise of racism and anti-racism, and strategies for decreasing racism and increasing anti-racism. It will explore potential answers to the following questions: How does one maintain one’s identity in a world in which cultures are becoming more similar as a result of globalization? How does racism develop and why? What are the connections among an increase in expression of racism, identity, and globalization? How can members from different groups coexist peacefully with one another? This course will utilize classic and contemporary studies from a variety of fields of psychology (e.g., clinical, social, health, community, cross cultural, political) and sociology to help students explore such questions as well as to them understand more fully people’s behaviors and events occurring in real time. Finally, the course will propose suggestions for enhancing collaboration with other people in reducing racism.

FLOR SOCY 3367 Syllabus

Gender, Culture and Society

This course will explore a range of theories and debates that surround the issue of gender in both Florence and international contexts. Students will develop an understanding of key concepts and ideas that have been applied to the study of gendered identity; critically analyze gendered identity in both Florence and the United States; and examine historical and contemporary case studies in order to investigate how and why gender is such a critical element of past and present identity politics.

FLOR SOCY/COMM 3309 Syllabus

Interculture and Migration

This course will explore the complexities of cultural identity and migration, and the impact they have on intercultural conflict and cooperation. There will be a particular focus on migration in Italy and on the marginalized communities of contemporary Italy, such as migrants, their Italian-born non-citizen children, and the Roma. We will examine the fluidity of cultural boundaries across time and space, and how ingroup and outgroup dynamics contribute to the manufacturing of fear and prejudice among populations. During their semester abroad, students will reflect on the various elements that define a culture while gaining an increased understanding of how culture shapes individuals and how our cultural identities interact in shared social spaces such as the piazze of Florence.

FLOR SOCY/COMM 3309 Syllabus

Interculture and Migration

This course will explore the complexities of cultural identity and migration, and the impact they have on intercultural conflict and cooperation. There will be a particular focus on migration in Italy and on the marginalized communities of contemporary Italy, such as migrants, their Italian-born non-citizen children, and the Roma. We will examine the fluidity of cultural boundaries across time and space, and how ingroup and outgroup dynamics contribute to the manufacturing of fear and prejudice among populations. During their semester abroad, students will reflect on the various elements that define a culture while gaining an increased understanding of how culture shapes individuals and how our cultural identities interact in shared social spaces such as the piazze of Florence.

FLOR URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Florence

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on Florence. Using the city as a research field, students will explore the complex dynamics that shape the identity of Florence by applying a critical perspective on the notion of globalization, and by analyzing the socio-cultural forces at play both historically and presently; observe the cultural variability in Florence; discuss the relativity of cultural values; and investigate how the multicultural aspect of Florence’s identity has been discursively constructed, and by which social actors.

INTP 3347 Syllabus

Remote Global Internship Course Semester Session I (3 Credits)

Delivered by dynamic academic coaches and mentors, the Online Global Internship Course course focuses on building personal and professional skills with the intention to prepare students to articulate their learning to future employers, and or, graduate schools. The virtual in-class active learning approach gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, compare and contrast global organizational behavior and management in a cross-cultural context.

INTP 3347 Syllabus

Remote Global Internship Course Semester Session II (3 Credits)

Delivered by dynamic academic coaches and mentors, the Online Global Internship Course course focuses on building personal and professional skills with the intention to prepare students to articulate their learning to future employers, and or, graduate schools. The virtual in-class active learning approach gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, compare and contrast global organizational behavior and management in a cross-cultural context.

INTP 3347 Syllabus

Remote Global Internship Course - Summer (3 Credits)

Delivered by dynamic academic coaches and mentors, the Online Global Internship Course course focuses on building personal and professional skills with the intention to prepare students to articulate their learning to future employers, and or, graduate schools. The virtual in-class active learning approach gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, compare and contrast global organizational behavior and management in a cross-cultural context.

INTP 3348 Syllabus

Remote Global Internship Course (6 Credits)

Delivered by dynamic academic coaches and mentors, the Online Global Internship Course course focuses on building personal and professional skills with the intention to prepare students to articulate their learning to future employers, and or, graduate schools. The virtual in-class active learning approach gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, compare and contrast global organizational behavior and management in a cross-cultural context.

IRS332 Syllabus

Natural Resource Management: Conflict & Cooperation

This course analyzes the transformation occurring at the intersection between the theory and practice of international relations on the one hand and issues related to the management and exploitation of environmental and natural resources on the other. The relative abundance or scarcity of natural resources has long been a major factor in accounting for the rise and fall of civilizations. It is also a major cause of regional tension and international warfare. Conflicts over the struggle for scarce natural resources (i.e. the so called 'resource curse') are common today while 'resource nationalism' in resource-rich countries (e.g. Russia, Venezuela, and Brazil), exacerbated by tight supply of conventional energy sources, harbors the potential for global economic disruption. In a similar vein, the global scale of modern economic systems blurs the traditional distinction between rich North and poor South. The rise of high-consumption societies now cuts across international regions and borders while the distance between those who benefit from high consumption and those who suffers from its social and environmental impact grows inexorably. Notwithstanding, we have witnessed over the last four decades the emergence of a deeper understanding of the intrinsic value of environmental natural resources along with a newly-felt sense of urgency for dealing with the collective problems arising from their use and (or) degradation. The concept of natural resources has expanded from a traditional, restrictive view of simple material economic inputs to one that now includes those environmental and ecosystem variables whose role is fundamental in guaranteeing the integrity of life-supporting earth systems. You will address and analyze these realities in three parts. You begin by reviewing the basic concepts and theories of international relations theories as well as the evolution of the analytical paradigms that have been used to frame the relation between human development and the natural environment. You will then focus on the visible output of global environmental politics, i.e. international regimes for environmental, nature and habitat protection and conservation. The course will end by looking in detail at the energy-climate nexus, as the competition for hydrocarbons represents a potential trigger of conflict but which also opens the doors to a serious effort to accelerate the pace of development and deployment of alternative sources of energy that are key to reducing the production of greenhouse gases. This course is cross-listed as ENV332

LNDN ARTA/BUSN 3338 Syllabus

Arts Administration: The Creative Industries in a Digital World

This course will focus on the structures of creative industries, and how arts administrators successfully share creativity with the public and leverage the commercial opportunities of creative production. Students will explore such topics as the arts as a business, managing financial imperatives and the artistic process, and promoting and presenting cultural products; examine case studies from a variety of fields such as film, digital media, gaming, theater, museums, and publishing; and engage directly with practitioners successfully working in fields of arts and culture, and those managing the interface between creativity and business in London.

LNDN ARTA/BUSN 3338 Syllabus

Arts Administration: The Creative Industries in a Digital World

This course will focus on the structures of creative industries, and how arts administrators successfully share creativity with the public and leverage the commercial opportunities of creative production. Students will explore such topics as the arts as a business, managing financial imperatives and the artistic process, and promoting and presenting cultural products; examine case studies from a variety of fields such as film, digital media, gaming, theater, museums, and publishing; and engage directly with practitioners successfully working in fields of arts and culture, and those managing the interface between creativity and business in London.

LNDN ARTH 3312 Syllabus

Modern Art in London: From Sublime to Ridiculous?

This course will examine modern works of art from the late 19th century through to the present. Students will analyze the development of modern art, particularly in response to World Wars I and II, through to contemporary practice; experience a diverse range of works on display in London; investigate attitudes and ideas in modern art; explore the effect of historical events, sociological changes, and advances in technology on the art world; gain an appreciation of a variety of materials and techniques; and develop an understanding of the global art market.

LNDN ARTH 3313 Syllabus

Contemporary World Architecture: London

This course will investigate several of the most recognizable themes in contemporary architectural production: tall buildings, iconic buildings, historic preservation, and sustainability. Students will compare some of the most (in)famous buildings in London to examples across the globe; develop an understanding of contemporary architecture; discuss and debate the roles that a variety of individuals and institutions have had in writing architectural history; and take an active part in writing some of that history for themselves.

LNDN ARTH/HIST 3314 Syllabus

London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture

This course will introduce British society, culture, and museology in an era when exhibition displays are often controversial and politically charged. Students will consider museums as reflections of the British psyche, as unique cultural constructs that help us understand ‘Britishness’, and as institutions of “global” heritage in the context of a global city with a British perspective; explore the development of the modern museum and its operation; analyze the impact British history, society, and politics have had on London museums, their creation, and their day-to-day operations and audiences; and conduct field work in eight different London museums.

LNDN ARTH/HIST 3314 Syllabus

London Museums: Introduction to British Museology, Society and Culture

This course will introduce British society, culture, and museology in an era when exhibition displays are often controversial and politically charged. Students will consider museums as reflections of the British psyche, as unique cultural constructs that help us understand ‘Britishness’, and as institutions of “global” heritage in the context of a global city with a British perspective; explore the development of the modern museum and its operation; analyze the impact British history, society, and politics have had on London museums, their creation, and their day-to-day operations and audiences; and conduct field work in eight different London museums.

LNDN BUSN 3372 Syllabus

International Marketing

This course will explore terms, concepts, and theories of marketing in the international context, as well as its scope and challenges. Students will examine the ways in which global dimensions technology, research, capital, investment, and production impact marketing, distribution, and communication networks; gain insight into the increasingly interdependent global economic and physical environment and its impact on international marketing; analyze current international marketing issues and their implications; and develop an understanding of how companies develop strategic plans that are competitive to survive and succeed in global markets.

LNDN BUSN 3373 Syllabus

International Finance

This course will explore the topic of international finance and the fact that, in a globally integrated world, it has become imperative to trade, invest, and conduct business operations internationally. Students will analyze opportunities and risks associated with international finance; acquire knowledge of theoretical concepts of finance and their adaptation to the international context; develop an understanding of historical perspectives and foundations of international finance, foreign exchange markets, exposure management, and financial management of a multinational firm; and investigate the impact of current economic and political developments on international finance.

LNDN BUSN 3374/ECON 3360 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will examine key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment (both goods and services and capital and labor), the global finance architecture, and competing in a global marketplace, as well as two underlying themes evident throughout the module: contemporary context and localized content of the material.

LNDN BUSN 3374/ECON 3360 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will examine key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment (both goods and services and capital and labor), the global finance architecture, and competing in a global marketplace, as well as two underlying themes evident throughout the module: contemporary context and localized content of the material.

LNDN BUSN 3376 Syllabus

International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior

This course, based on interdisciplinary research, will examine how theories, research, and current issues in the field of organizational behavior apply in the context of the international workplace. Students will focus on the international application of core management theories and strategies; develop an understanding of human behavior within the setting of a global work environment, and across a variety of historical and current issues; reflect critically on how theoretical frameworks can be applied and developed within the organizational setting; and collaborate with CAPA Sydney students through CAPA’s Globally Networked Learning (GNL) technology.

LNDN BUSN 3378 Syllabus

Global Workforce Management

This course will provide students with an integrative framework for understanding the challenges associated with effective workforce management on a global scale. Students will compare international labor markets in terms of labor costs, labor supply, workplace culture, and employment law; and analyze high-profile news events from both developed and emerging economies that illustrate the cultural and regulatory complexities that multinational firms face in such areas as talent management, performance management, offshore outsourcing, downsizing, and industrial relations.

LNDN BUSN 3380 Syllabus

Managing Global Supply Chains

This course will focus on issues within operations of relevance in a firm’s ability to remain competitive in a global economy. Students will analyze examples of companies collaborating across the globe; develop an understanding of the operational and tactical aspects of managing a network of multiple facilities; investigate their strategic implications; consider legal, ethical, operational, venture risk, and reliability factors; and examine such topics as outsourcing and offshoring, information technology in operations, designing and managing global supply chains, managing inventory and global logistics, and sustainability.

LNDN BUSN 3387 Syllabus

Finance for Entrepreneurs and Startups

This course provides an understanding of how new ventures founded by entrepreneurs obtain financing in their quest to expand. In a global world dominated by high tech ventures, how do these ventures become so successful in the marketplace and have a market value worth in excess of hundreds of billions of dollars? The course exposes the students to the opportunities and risks associated with new entrepreneurial ventures, how to obtain financing, who are the venture capital investors, and the stages of a successful venture.

LNDN BUSN 3388 Syllabus

Principles of International Business: Navigating in the Age of the Coronavirus

This course explores the important concepts and perspectives for international business in the “age of coronavirus.” Students will examine the external and internal conditions that multinational enterprises must recognize, interpret and steer to prosper and thrive. Globalization will be introduced and interpreted alongside the world’s systems, frameworks, structures, patterns, strategies, approaches, and channels for achieving organizational success in the global marketplace. In addition to examining the established theory and application behind the management of political, economic, socio-cultural, and technological factors, the course will investigate the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on global commerce. Students will be expected to increase their understanding of international business across all theoretical areas in the context of global events during the COVID-19 pandemic.

LNDN COLT 3311 Syllabus

Post-War British Pop Culture

This course will explore theories of popular culture from the British Isles, from 1945 through to the present day. Students will compare British and American experiences of popular culture, the differences, similarities, and cross-influences; examine countercultures and subcultures in Britain; explore their connections to music and political movements; develop an understanding of cultures that are based on ethnicity and sexuality, as well as concerns around diversity and related hate crime; and visit urban environments that will help contextualize these subcultures both historically and politically.

LNDN COLT 3312 Syllabus

London Across History, Literature, and Film

This course will introduce London across history, literature, and film through canonical literary texts from Samuel Johnson to Arthur Conan Doyle, and to contemporary representations of multicultural London from Hanif Kureishi to Zadie Smith. Students will read both literary and filmic texts; take a historical tour of London through the eyes of great writers and filmmakers; and examine questions of race and culture in contemporary London as represented through literature and film. It is hoped that Hanif Kureishi and Stephen Frears will visit the class.

LNDN COMM 3321 Syllabus

Ethics in the Media: Case Studies from US and UK Perspectives

This course will address principle ethical issues facing journalism, advertising, entertainment media, and online content. Students will examine the moral obligations of the producers as well as the responsibilities borne by consumers; develop an understanding of applicable ethical principles and philosophies; apply these to present day cases in the media through case studies; and critically engage with content in order to analyze ethical issues present in the production and consumption of media on an individual and societal level.

LNDN COMM 3322 Syllabus

Creative Connections: Advertising and Marketing in Britain

This course will explore the topics of advertising and marketing in Britain. Students will develop an understanding of the ways in which advertising is effectively planned to achieve the objectives set in the overall marketing plan, with reference to London as a global center for creative and production excellence; and conduct a comparative analysis of British advertising methods and styles. A complete syllabus will be available soon.

LNDN COMM 3328 Syllabus

Strategic Communication and Social Media: Theory and Practice

This course will explore the theory and practice of strategic communication and its implementation through social media platforms. Students will explore traditional and online communication strategies; review theories and principles of strategic communication and social media practices; investigate the effectiveness of messaging strategies employed by individuals and influencers, not-for-profits, and commercial organizations; and work for a real-world client to formulate an overarching communication strategy, inclusive of recommendations for messaging strategies across all platforms.

LNDN CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the City: London

This course will introduce creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine how various subjects such as the river, urban spaces, solitude, ethnicity, particular boroughs, and characters (both fictional and real) function in London narratives; develop an understanding of the role of memory and experience in literary psycho-geographical accounts of the metropolis; utilize their observations of London to practice creative writing; and investigate the potential of place within the narrative of various genres.

LNDN FILM 3311 Syllabus

Contemporary British Film

This course will chart the development of British film from 1994-2012, a period of confidence and success mirrored by a major structural and financial reorganization in the industry. Students will critically analyze key films and how they both emerge from and transform earlier British cinema tradition; develop an understanding of important British genres and film-making tropes; explore the ways in which British films reflect and respond to contemporary social and political conditions and events; and develop an awareness of specific ways in which UK and US film differs.

LNDN FILM 3361 Syllabus

Diversity in British Cinema: Race, Gender, and Class

This intensive and comprehensive course will allow students to take an innovative approach that sees race, gender and class in close dialogue with the underlying cultural phenomena that shape the British cinematic landscape. The course is designed to introduce students to British cinema whilst engaging in theory, practice and analysis. It intertwines historical accounts with film screenings and lectures as well as discussions with filmmakers and curators.

LNDN FILM 3362 Syllabus

City Symphony: Experimental Cinema

This course will encourage students to theorize and document their own experiences as visitors to London and, while rooted in the historical context of the early 20th century, use the genre of the city symphony as a prism through which to examine several key features of early cinema, from sound/silence to montage and visual language.

LNDN FILM 3366 Syllabus

Urban Scavenger

This course will explore the camera as a tool for the excavation of ordinary things scattered in the urban spaces of a modern metropolis. Students will develop an understanding of a theoretical framework; gain a related practical skillset; take their camera out into the city of London for hands-on exercises; and participate in readings, screenings, and course discussions that will facilitate their ability to experience the city with a critical and documentary approach.

LNDN FILM 3367 Syllabus

The City Made Strange: London on Screen in Horror and Science Fiction Cinema

This course will examine science fiction, horror, and noir/neogothic cinema and television from all eras, with emphasis on works that give London a major role in their story. Students will analyze such examples as disaster or alien invasion films that see the city as a site of devastation, horror films which render a familiar city frightening and strange, or noir explorations of London’s underbelly.

LNDN HIST 3310 Syllabus

Britain in the Twentieth Century: From Imperial to Global

This course will explore how Britain has responded to political, social, and cultural forces during the 20th century. Students will develop a deeper understanding of life in Britain today by examining such topics as changing perceptions about the role of the state; the decline of empire; the effect of two world wars; economic strategies; the development of multiculturalism; and the role of women, with an emphasis on how the lives of ordinary British people have changed during the last century.

LNDN HSCI 3120 Syllabus

Comparative Healthcare Systems

This course will introduce the UK healthcare system and the context within which it operates. Students will explore the evolution of the National Health Service (NHS) from its inception in 1948 to present day; analyze case studies to compare the UK model of healthcare with other healthcare systems such as in the United States, France, Sweden, and lower income countries; develop an understanding of concepts and themes in comparative healthcare; and critically examine the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in healthcare.

LNDN HSCI/HIST 3121 Syllabus

Global Perspective on Nursing and Midwifery History

This course will explore the development of nursing practice from the perspectives of medical, nursing, and midwifery history. Students will explore the impacts of social change, evolving attitudes to care, and the role of the Enlightenment, French Revolution, and American Independence, as well as the transition from Agrarian to Industrial Society in shaping nursing care; consider contributions made by Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole, and Mrs Bedford-Fenwick to nursing practice; examine the effect of religion, philosophy, ethics, law, sociology, and economics on clinical practice and the professional role and practice of nurses and midwives; and reflect on related historical changes.

LNDN HSCI/HIST 3121 Syllabus

Global Perspective on Nursing and Midwifery History

This course will explore the development of nursing practice from the perspectives of medical, nursing, and midwifery history. Students will explore the impacts of social change, evolving attitudes to care, and the role of the Enlightenment, French Revolution, and American Independence, as well as the transition from Agrarian to Industrial Society in shaping nursing care; consider contributions made by Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole, and Mrs Bedford-Fenwick to nursing practice; examine the effect of religion, philosophy, ethics, law, sociology, and economics on clinical practice and the professional role and practice of nurses and midwives; and reflect on related historical changes.

LNDN INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course (GIC) provides a unique and innovative opportunity for students to engage in an internship abroad for academic credit. Through its academic content, the course frames and supports learning that occurs at the internship placement and students’ personal and professional development.     The GIC supports CEA CAPA's philosophy and practice of enabling students to learn about the social and cultural context of their internship through comparative global analysis on both micro- and macro- levels. In-class active learning gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, organizational behavior, and management in a cross-cultural context. Out-of-class field studies engage experiential and place-based pedagogies that enhance in-class discussions. Students also analyze the importance of, and approaches to, justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) from national and international perspectives. 

LNDN INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (6 credits)

The Global Internship Course (GIC) provides a unique and innovative opportunity for students to engage in an internship abroad for academic credit. Through its academic content, the course frames and supports learning that occurs at the internship placement and students’ personal and professional development. The GIC supports CEA CAPA's philosophy and practice of enabling students to learn about the social and cultural context of their internship through comparative global analysis on both micro- and macro- levels. In-class active learning gives students the opportunity to discuss and analyze theories and models of work, organizational behavior, and management in a cross-cultural context. Out-of-class field studies engage experiential and place-based pedagogies that enhance in-class discussions. Students also analyze the importance of, and approaches to, justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) from national and international perspectives.

LNDN LITR 3312 Syllabus

Shakespeare and London

This course will explore a selection of Shakespeare’s plays to uncover his style and craft within the genres of comedy, history, and tragedy. Students will engage in Shakespeare's timelessness and learn to appreciate how vitally his ideas, themes, and concepts move from the concerns of his day to our own; develop skills of paraphrasing and textual analysis; analyze the relationship between plays; and examine the structure of different dramatic genres.

LNDN LITR 3315 Syllabus

Detective Fiction: Crime and The City

This course will address the development of the modern detective novel—British and American—from the late 19th century into the 21st century. Students will focus on cities as sites of criminal imagination, and on detectives as explorers of the city’s hidden connections; develop an understanding of the concept of the detective story and why crime fiction is one of the most popular forms of narrative; and explore specific connections between detective fiction and the urban environment, social dynamics, and the writers’ attitudes to such topics as diversity and ethnicity.

LNDN LITR 3318 Syllabus

Literature and the Environment

This course will examine how writers in English have engaged with the natural environment. Students will read a range of authors and genres, from the advent of industrialization in the late 18th century up to the present age of climate change, to consider how they have celebrated the natural world and looked critically at human effects on ecosystems; analyze the qualities of writings about the environment and their historical and political contexts; and take several field trips to consider the design and representation of London’s “urban nature”.

LNDN PSYC 3352 Syllabus

Child Development in a British Context

This course will investigate the aims and principles of developmental psychology as a scientific discipline, and describe the methods used to obtain knowledge about children and their development. Students will explore issues such as children's early attachments, the development of the self, the emergence of consciousness, and the role of play; develop an understanding of the role of education and child care practices and policies in the UK in shaping children's development; and examine childhood from historical, global, socio-cultural, and policy perspectives.

LNDN SOCY 3349 Syllabus

Community Engagement: Service-Learning in London

This interdisciplinary course with a sociological focus will present a unique opportunity in which students will become directly involved in the realities of community engagement and grassroots politics through community service placements. Students will engage in critical thought and reflection on urban inequalities in London while examining the historical, sociological, and political context of community service and social, economic, and political exclusion in the UK. Students will explore three key interrelated themes: urban life, super-diversity, and welfare and exclusion. This course is 6 credits.

LNDN SOCY 3350 Syllabus

Understanding Modern Britain

This multidisciplinary course will examine images, values, symbols, and individuals by which Britain represents itself as a means to understanding this nation. Students will investigate the ways in which modern Britain and British identities have been imagined, constructed, and experienced at home and internationally; engage directly with the heritage industry and contemporary British culture; and interpret the legacy of Britain’s past upon the ways in which the contemporary nation and British identities are structured in the 21st century.

LNDN SOCY 3353 Syllabus

Queer Studies and LGBTQ Life in London and the Global World

This is a Queer Studies course which will analyze the relationship between sexuality and London's history from the late 19th century to the present day. Students will explore how understandings of sexuality have changed; consider how western identity terms, such as bisexual, gay, lesbian, straight, and transgender, are relatively recent inventions; acknowledge how these terms have been reclaimed as a result of various political movements and freedom struggles; and engage with contemporary Queer life and culture in London via an interdisciplinary approach to sexuality.

LNDN SOCY 3355 Syllabus

Experiencing Globalization: Society, Space and Everyday Life in London

This course will explore London’s complex relationship with the forces of globalization and the ways in which everyday life and experience in London, as well as its people, institutions, and organizations, have been shaped by—and are contributing to—global change. Students will critically examine the effects of neoliberal globalization, the growing (though uneven) global dominance of projects promoting increasing freedoms for capital under the banners of “free markets” and “free trade; develop an understanding of a variety of collective challenges to these projects; analyze their economic, political, cultural, and ecological aspects; and address several theoretical and conceptual concerns.

LNDN SOCY/WNST 3362 Syllabus

Feminist London: Activism in the City

This course will enable students to engage directly with London as a specific landscape in which feminism is embedded, examining the historical and ongoing legacy of feminism in the city: how feminists have shaped and continue to influence the fabric of London, not only its physical infrastructure, but also its identity, reputation, and character. Topics include women’s writing, sexuality, consumerism, class dynamics, campaigns for political rights and representation, fashion and style, imperialism and its legacies, feminism and popular culture, Black & Asian feminisms, and the impact of social media upon feminist activism and discourse. This course taps into the zeitgeist surrounding women’s activism and utilizes the London cityscape enabling students to apply classroom learning to their field studies and their own experiences.

LNDN SOCY/WNST 3362 Syllabus

Feminist London: Activism in the City

This course will enable students to engage directly with London as a specific landscape in which feminism is embedded, examining the historical and ongoing legacy of feminism in the city: how feminists have shaped and continue to influence the fabric of London, not only its physical infrastructure, but also its identity, reputation, and character. Topics include women’s writing, sexuality, consumerism, class dynamics, campaigns for political rights and representation, fashion and style, imperialism and its legacies, feminism and popular culture, Black & Asian feminisms, and the impact of social media upon feminist activism and discourse. This course taps into the zeitgeist surrounding women’s activism and utilizes the London cityscape enabling students to apply classroom learning to their field studies and their own experiences.

LNDN THTR 3310 Syllabus

Theater in the City

This course will place students at the heart of the experience of theater. Students will engage with the key ideas underpinning the creation of theatricality, and attend a range of different performances and tours of specific theater spaces. They will explore such topics as the qualities, conditions, and boundaries of drama, audience engagement, philosophical issues raised by the theatrical experience, the origins of theater, the changing roles of performers and spectators over time, and the theater's prospects in the 21st century.

LNDN THTR 3312 Syllabus

Writing A Play: The Art and Craft of Making Theatre

This course will introduce a variety of skills required to write a stage play. Students will consider a range of stimuli from their experience of London people, places, events, and ideas; focus on a toolbox approach to carefully consider the various elements of dialog, characterization, structure and themes; develop their ideas into fully fledged one-act plays; and have their play read by a group of professional actors before an invited audience at CAPA’s studio facility: The Street. Students will pay $40 for this course upon arrival in London, which pays for theater tickets.

LNDN THTR 3314 Syllabus

Witchcraft and Magical Performance in London

This course will chart the representation of the occult in the city from the Early Modern period to the present day. Students will focus particularly on the performance and presentation of the occult and magical phenomena and its reception by the general public and social elites during specific time periods; develop an understanding of why magic has long been a subject of fascination; visit sites such as the Society for Psychical Research or the British Magic Circle; and attend a live performance of the magical or ghostly in London.

LNDN THTR 3315 Syllabus

Shakespeare at Play: Performing the Bard using Folio and Physical Techniques

This performance-based theater course will explore the possibilities of performing Shakespeare using folio and physical techniques. Students will engage in acting techniques that utilize mind/body awareness; analyze acting clues from the First Folio (the first printed collection of plays published in 1623); use vocal and physical exercises in practical activities; practice physical theater techniques such as those used by Meyerhold, Lecoq, and Boal; and attend performances and events taking place at the Globe in London and the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford.

LNDN URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: London, Modernity, Empire, and Globalization

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on London, one of the world's most significant global cities, in comparative context. Students will examine London’s changing identity as a world city with a particular emphasis on comparing the city's imperial, postcolonial, and transatlantic connections, and the ways in which past and present, local and global intertwine in the capital. Students will combine classroom work with experiential learning, centred on field studies to areas such as Brixton, Spitalfields, Southbank, and the Olympic sites in East London.

MKT300BCN Syllabus

Principles of Marketing

This course will begin by providing an overview of the marketing process, with a focus on developing successful marketing strategies in different environments. Students will then shift to understanding buyers and markets, emphasizing the study of consumer behavior. This will allow students to discuss how to target differ-ent marketing opportunities, by exploring segmentation, targeting and positioning. Finally, this course will also explore satisfying these market opportunities, by looking into the fields of product development, advertising, and public relations.

MKT310BCN Syllabus

Consumer Behavior

In this course students will learn why consumers behave the way they do, how environmental forces influence and shape our behavior, and the practical marketing implications of that behavior. Topics will include consumer behavior decision making and the effects that internal influences (motivation, perception, affect, personality, lifestyles, and values) and external influences (culture, family, social class, competition, group influences and social media) have in that decision making process.

MKT333BCN Syllabus

Sport Marketing

This course will provide an overview of several facets of the sports marketing industry including: athlete representation/management, marketing of clients and events, industry structure, technology, strategy, and broadcasting. You will analyze different theories and methods sport managers utilize for conducting relationships with consumers in sport environments and you will learn about sport consumer behavior, marketing research in sport industry, marketing plan processes, promotional activities, advertising, and corporate sponsorship. The sports industry is extremely diverse, in that it covers everything from professional to leisure sports, individual and team sports, big events such as the Olympic Games to local events and athlete representation among other topics. You will learn about each of these areas while incorporating field studies in order to gain a deeper understanding of the industry.

MKT338 Syllabus

Brand Barcelona: Marketing the Global City

Just as industrialization in the 19th century determined the development and role of the city during the modern period, so the advent of the post-industrial economy and globalization is transforming the city of the post-modern period. As economic control slips from the grasp of nation states, it is left to cities to compete amongst themselves for the investments and incomes so critical to the replacement of vanishing industrial bases. In the process, cities are forced to transform and re-brand themselves as they struggle to adapt to the new geographical, economic and symbolic environment in which they find themselves. Brand Barcelona: Marketing the Global City will critically examine the success of the Barcelona Model of urban redevelopment and self-reinvention, paying particular attention to the way in which marketing has extended its sphere of influence from the selling of commodities to the selling of places. Given the consequent commodification of the city, the question will be raised as to who has benefited and who has lost out in this transformation. As well as providing a solid foundation in theory, the course will also consider contemporary debates over the regeneration of Barcelona and will involve you in an exploration of the invisible city that is concealed by Barcelonas business/tourist friendly facade, through field studies and films. An important part of the assessment will involve project work, through which you will be encouraged to uncover aspects of the city that reveal something significant about how it is being transformed and reinvented through its global promotion. Cross-listed as CUL358

MKT340BCN Syllabus

Digital Marketing

This digital marketing course aims at answering how to professionally present, promote, and place what we want an audience to sell and buy online, considering the most effective and attractive resources to do it. To that end, a semester will be devoted to exploring the 'Three Ts of Marketing.' This course will focus on trade, trends, and tools in both theory and practice. Readings, debates, guest speakers, and multiple activities will provide students with insight and expertise in a growing and attractive field.

MKT380 Syllabus

Fashion Marketing & Merchandising

The world of fashion is dynamic and highly competitive. The task of gathering assortments that appeal to consumers is a challenging and rewarding occupation. To meet this challenge knowledge of products availability and incentives that drive consumers to buy is imperative. Fundamental to this knowledge is an understanding of retailer's role in channeling products from producers to customers. Buyers differentiate between stores and other retail formats from competitors by the types of merchandise offered and the pricing strategies they employ. Understanding the dynamics and differences of retail buying concepts is critical to the success of those interested in buying and selling retail consumer fashion merchandise and services. This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change: the history and development, organization and operation, merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion. For those majoring in Business, Marketing and Public Relations one of the greatest advantages of this course and of being in Florence is that you enjoy fantastic opportunities to make contacts with industry professionals. Florence and nearby Prato house many fashion, textile and buying companies, so frequent field trips to the Gucci prototype handbag factory, the headquarters of Roberto Cavalli, Ferragamo museum, and Angela Caputi's workshop; Pitti Immagini trade shows; and resident buying offices. Guest speakers at each of these sites will explain their work, give you valuable insights into their careers. *This course is cross-listed as FAS380

MKT381FLR Syllabus

Viticulture & Wine Marketing

This course is an introduction to wine marketing strategies and an exploration of the dynamic nature of the wine sector, with particular attention given to the production and complexity of wine. Students will develop an awareness of the international business of wine and be able to identify some of the factors that affect the sector's macro-environment, as well as the aspects that influence competition. Through experiential learning activities like wine tastings and visits to vineyards, wine retailers, or distribution facilities, students will develop a critical sense for wine characteristics and identi